The Dying Light

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Do not go gentle into the dark night,
Rage, Rage, against the dying of the light
-Dylan Thomas-

The Mist…

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Fog: The only way you’re able to walk with your head in de clouds.
I love the way it makes the world look new and different.

This little light of mine…

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This little light of mine, I’m going to let it shine
This little light of mine, I’m going to let it shine
This little light of mine, I’m going to let it shine
Every day, every day, every day, every day
Gonna let my little light shine.

Fields of Gold

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I never made promises lightly
And there have been some that I’ve broken
But I swear in the days still left
We’ll walk in fields of gold
We’ll walk in fields of gold
– Sting “Fields of Gold” (but I like the Evy Cassidy cover better 😉 )

Stained Glass / Glas-in-lood

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Stained glass, as an art and a craft, requires the artistic skill to conceive an appropriate and workable design, and the engineering skills to assemble the piece. A window must fit snugly into the space for which it is made, must resist wind and rain, and also, especially in the larger windows, must support its own weight. Many large windows have withstood the test of time and remained substantially intact since the late Middle Ages. In Western Europe they constitute the major form of pictorial art to have survived. In this context, the purpose of a stained glass window is not to allow those within a building to see the world outside or even primarily to admit light but rather to control it. For this reason stained glass windows have been described as ‘illuminated wall decorations’.
The design of a window may be non-figurative or figurative; may incorporate narratives drawn from the Bible, history, or literature; may represent saints or patrons, or use symbolic motifs, in particular armorial. Windows within a building may be thematic, for example: within a church – episodes from the life of Christ; within a parliament building – shields of the constituencies; within a college hall – figures representing the arts and sciences; or within a home – flora, fauna, or landscape.

I love it!

Don’t Worry, Be Happy

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Here is a little song I wrote
You might want to sing it note for note
Don’t worry be happy
In every life we have some trouble
When you worry you make it double
Don’t worry, be happy……

Climb every mountain

Climb every mountain

Climb every moutain,search high and low.
Follow every highway,every pad you know.
Climb every mountain,voud every stream.
Follow every rainbow,till you find your dream.

A dream that will need,all the love you can give.
Every day of your life,for as long as you live.

Climb every mountain,voud every stream.
Follow every rainbow,till you find your dream.

A dream that will need,all the love you can give.
Every day of your life,for as long as you live.

Climb every mountain,voud every stream.
Follow every rainbow,till you find your dream
-Sound of Music

Crossroad

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In folk magic and mythology, crossroads may represent a location “between the worlds” and, as such, a site where supernatural spirits can be contacted and paranormal events can take place. Symbolically, it can mean a locality where two realms touch and therefore represents liminality, a place literally “neither here nor there”, “betwixt and between”.
-Wikipedia

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For those who are missed or in need

I’m thinking of you…

O lieb’, solang du lieben kannst!
O lieb’, solang du lieben magst!
Die Stunde kommt, die Stunde kommt,
Wo du an Gräbern stehst und klagst!

Und sorge, daß dein Herze glüht
Und Liebe hegt und Liebe trägt,
Solang ihm noch ein ander Herz
In Liebe warm entgegenschlägt!

Und wer dir seine Brust erschließt,
O tu ihm, was du kannst, zulieb’!
Und mach’ ihm jede Stunde froh,
Und mach ihm keine Stunde trüb!

Und hüte deine Zunge wohl,
Bald ist ein böses Wort gesagt!
O Gott, es war nicht bös gemeint, –
Der andre aber geht und klagt.

O lieb’, solang du lieben kannst!
O lieb’, solang du lieben magst!
Die Stunde kommt, die Stunde kommt,
Wo du an Gräbern stehst und klagst!

Dann kniest du nieder an der Gruft
Und birgst die Augen, trüb und naß,
– Sie sehn den andern nimmermehr –
Ins lange, feuchte Kirchhofsgras.

Und sprichst: O schau’ auf mich herab,
Der hier an deinem Grabe weint!
Vergib, daß ich gekränkt dich hab’!
O Gott, es war nicht bös gemeint!

Er aber sieht und hört dich nicht,
Kommt nicht, daß du ihn froh umfängst;
Der Mund, der oft dich küßte, spricht
Nie wieder: Ich vergab dir längst!

Er tat’s, vergab dir lange schon,
Doch manche heiße Träne fiel
Um dich und um dein herbes Wort –
Doch still – er ruht, er ist am Ziel!

O lieb’, solang du lieben kannst!
O lieb’, solang du lieben magst!
Die Stunde kommt, die Stunde kommt,
Wo du an Gräbern stehst und klagst!

– Ferdinand Freiligrath

Beatle and the Tree

Hoe de jaren ineens terug telden

On the Großglockner Straße (Austria)

I really enjoy oldtimers because they bring me to a time where I would love to walk around for a few weeks a year. Anywhere between 1920-1955 will do.
This picture brings me there in a heartbeat, I love it!